It’s never too early, or too late, to teach your kids about activism and the importance of giving back to others in need – especially around the holidays.

One of the many great things about FEED Supper is how flexible and versatile it is, plus, it’s a great entry point to activism.

We put together some tips and ideas to make your next FEED Supper applicable to kiddos. We promise they’ll love it.

 

Make it a cooking class

Kids love nothing more than getting their hands dirty, so why not put it to good use! A few years ago, FEED friend Joy Cho of Oh Joy! hosted an amazing FEED Supper where they had all the kids (with help, of course) make homemade ravioli – and then gather together to eat it! You can do something even easier, too, like make-your-own pizzas, paninis, or serve lunch or dinner and have the kids decorate cakes or cupcakes for dessert.

Plan an impactful activity  

Even if you don’t go all out and have the kids cook or decorate the food themselves, it’s good to have an activity and in this case, an impactful one would be even better. For example, you could have all the adults bring canned goods, diapers, feminine hygiene products, etc., with them to the supper and have the kiddos help pack them up into boxes before dinner. Donate these goods to a local women’s shelter or food bank and you have a FEED Supper with double the impact!

Incorporate kid-friendly elements

We have some stunning inspo to share for this one. A few years ago, Kid & Coe hosted an unforgettable, outdoor FEED Supper for mamas and their little ones. While very much appealing to the adult crowd with incredible food, wine and more, they incorporated little elements to keep kiddos entertained and happy. At this supper, they placed a little bundle of crayons as part of each place setting. You could also do legos, cute blocks or a little puzzle.

Talk about the issue of hunger from their POV

We’ve found that kids get more excited about FEED Supper when they can actually understand and digest the issue at hand and the reason for giving back. There are great facts about hunger available online and on our Supper Toolkits, but many overarching statistics that feel so powerful and urgent to us as adults, can feel a bit too big and broad for kiddos to grasp. Instead, talk to them about it in terms of kids in their school, town or state who might be experiencing food insecurity. Talk to them about scenarios that are familiar to them – like eating lunch in the cafeteria or packing up their favorite lunch box with snacks for the park – and how they might feel if they didn’t have those things. Break down the terms and keep it very hopeful – there’s something we can all do, including them!

Involve them in the process

Have them set the table, decorate the Supper placemats (or pick up some plain paper placemats for them to beautify, if you aren’t using a Toolkit), help set up the fundraising page online (if they are old enough) and write out the seating cards.

If your little ones are game, make their next birthday party a FEED Supper. We’ve found that kids enjoy FEED Supper and giving back even more when they feel like they are actually involved and making a difference.

Keep it simple.

Don’t overcomplicate things. Order a bunch of pizzas, make a yummy, healthy version of mac and cheese, forgo formal invitations and even formal place settings. The most important thing is coming together with your little ones, to teach them the importance of activism, getting involved and making a difference.