In the sticky heat of high summer, as some of us are emerging slowly and safely from our fully isolated cocoons of spring, I have been consciously trying to use my time (between mom-ing and working) to journey inward. The process of discovering oneself, healing unconscious wounds and reprogramming the way we look at ourselves, our relationships, and the world at large is a lifelong one and much to my chagrin, one that will not be “solved” during this time. But I feel very fortunate to be able to use this period of necessary pause to read, write and reflect. 

And while I am far from waking up at dawn to meditate and journal, I have been thoroughly enjoying soaking in some wisdoms and exercises from these female sages:

– “Untamed” by Glennon Doyle was like a good therapy session wrapped up in a witty and personal novel. I recommend this to all women who have wanted to connect more deeply to their life’s purpose and live a more whole, conscious, and love-filled life (I’m thinking this might be all of us).
    – “Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of A Course in Miracles” by Marianne Williamson and her Instagram videos have given me so much comfort the last few months with her universal message to lean into love, not fear. 
      – Brene Brown’s “Unlocking Us” podcast has so many useful nuggets and brilliant guests from Glennon Doyle, to Dr. Marc Brackett, discussing human nature, our emotions and more
        – “The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity” by Julia Cameron is a twelve-week course to help the struggling artist in us all with weekly lessons and assignments.

          While some of us can use this extra time spent at home to better ourselves – whatever that may mean to you – I recognize that this is a privilege. Many of us are struggling now more than ever just to make ends meet. 

          According to a recent Brookings report, “by the end of April, more than one in five households in the U.S. and two in five households with mothers and children 12 and under were food insecure.” Their data reveals rates of food insecurity that are meaningfully higher than at any point in the last 19 years.

          The latest census data (which included the first measurement of nationwide hunger since 2018), revealed that 29 percent of Black households and 24 percent of Hispanic households reported that their children were not eating enough, compared with 9 percent of white households.

          These last few months have brought some of the most humbling and eye-opening national (and individual) reckonings when it comes to systemic racism and injustice. I have been listening, learning and growing, with the help of some incredible resources on racial injustice. Two in particular that I found both helpful and inspiring: 

          – “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates

          – “How to be an Antiracist” by Ibram X Kendi

            There is a lot that feels out of control in this challenging  time, but what we can control is how we, as individuals, rise to the occasion. Right now we are called to be good neighbors, global citizens, and activists, raising our voices and caring for those who are most vulnerable. 

            If you are unsure of where to begin, we published a list of frontline hunger fighting organizations a few months ago. If it is within your means to do so, please read, share, and donate to one of these organizations. If you cannot donate (or already have), there are other ways you can do some good right now – from having difficult conversations with friends and family, to speaking out on your platforms, or fundraising. 

            Together we can do a world of good – now, more than ever, is the time to start. 

             

            Here are a few of the things I’ve been loving and living in this past month: 

            Change-making 

            In order to make an even bigger difference right now, we launched a limited-run of Relief Bandanas, to help food banks meet the increase in need, in five cities in the U.S. P.S. You can do even more good by wearing yours as a mask. 

            Friends of FEED

            The Isolation Journals by Suelika Jaouad features daily prompts for journaling together in isolation. Suelika has been a friend for years and her depth as a writer and as human are profound.  She recruits friends and fellow writers to contribute prompts to this 100 day journaling project. I was thrilled to contribute the latest prompt! 

            The FEED Ambassador Program

            In case you missed it, we recently launched an ambassador program to celebrate the incredible, diverse, change-makers in our community. Apply to join the movement! 

            Reading

            I’ve been devouring some really meaningful books to expand my horizons this month, from Brene Brown to Ibram X Kendi to Brit Bennett’s latest novel. 

            FEED Fave

            We recently launched our newest leather style, The Greta, which I was lucky enough to get my hands on a little early. It’s such an effortless, everyday style, with a convenient zip closure. I’ve been taking it everywhere, from the beach, to the farm stand, to social-distanced outdoor hangs. 

            Ask LBL: 

            What’s the greatest need you see for girls and young women? 

            I think the greatest need for girls and women is to first value ourselves and own our voices, passions and vision, and honor our power to contribute to making the world a more beautiful and just place for all.  All too often, girls and young women shrink due to cultural expectations, pressures and responsibilities. For me, it is only in my 30s that I have started to unpack a lot of the conscious and unconscious learnings I absorbed in childhood about what it means to be a ‘good’ girl, daughter, sister, wife and mother – and identify which of these learnings ring true to me now and what no longer serves me.  It is a very difficult, but freeing process. If this strikes a nerve, I highly recommend reading Glennon Doyle’s new book “Untamed” as a starting point.

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